Scheme membership FAQs

Sometimes, despite our best efforts to give you all the information you need, you'll have some questions.

Our Frequently Asked Questions below will help you answer many of your common questions about Scheme Membership.

  • How much do I have to pay into my pension?

    From April 2014, the amount you pay into your pension will change. The table below shows the level of contributions you will pay.

    Rates

     Lower Salary

     Higher Salary

     Contribution Rate in 2014-15

     Increase (against 2013/14)

     

    14,999

    6.4%

    0.0%

    15,000

    25,999

    7.2%

    0.2%

    26,000

    31,999

    8.3%

    0.4%

    32,000

    39,999

    9.5%

    0.7%

    40,000

    44,999

    9.9%

    0.7%

    45,000

    74,999

    11.0%

    0.9%

    75,000

    99,999

    11.6%

    1.0%

    100,000

     

    12.4%

    1.2%

    In addition to your contributions, your employer pays a further 14.1% towards your pension.

  • If I have more than one employer, should they all deduct contributions from my salary?

    Yes, if you have more than one employer and you're not sure whether or not they are deducting contributions, please contact them immediately.

  • Who can be a member of the Teachers' Pension Scheme?

    As long as you’re a teacher or lecturer employed by a local authority or an academy. Or you’re in an independent school or a further or higher education establishment that has been accepted into the Teachers' Pension Scheme, you'll be in pensionable service and can join the scheme.

    Alternatively, you could be a teacher working for a Function Provider (a company awarded a contract to perform functions on behalf of a local authority).

    To become a member of the scheme you must also be between the ages of 18 and 75.

     

  • If I have previous service in the scheme and then I opt-out, what happens to my previous service?

    When you opt-out, you become what's known as a 'deferred member'. This means that your accrued service will remain in the scheme for you to claim as pension benefits when you reach your Normal Pension Age. Alternatively, you can transfer your service out of the scheme to another pension provider.

    But, please think very carefully before you opt out or transfer your pension to another provider. Consider your long-term financial position. Compare and contrast the benefits of your teachers’ pension with those offered by alternative personal pension plans or any other arrangements. Consult an Independent Financial Adviser or your teachers’ association.

  • What is my Normal Pension Age (NPA)?

    Your Normal Pension Age (or NPA) is the age at which you can claim your pension benefits without them being subject to any actuarial adjustments or reductions.

    If you’ve been a member of the Teachers’ Pension Scheme since 1 January 2007 you will have a Normal Pension Age (NPA) of 65.

    However, if you started teaching before 1 January 2007 and were a member of the Teachers’ Pension Scheme (or its equivalent in Scotland or Northern Ireland) then things are different. Your normal pension age will be 60 – provided you haven’t had a break in service of more than five years.

Last Updated: 29/8/2012

Related Information

Our handy guides may also help you find what you're looking for:

New member guide

Active members

Planning for retirement

Retired member guide

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